Hypnotherapy in Ely & Newmarket: Update on Restarting Face-to-Face Sessions

With the pandemic having lasted over a year now, and lockdown three itself having entered its third month, it's great that things are finally looking more positive as we move through the year. My daughters are both back at school and doing well, bootcamp has restarted, we can now meet members of another household outdoors and finally (FINALLY!) the return of face to face sessions in Ely and Newmarket is on the near horizon.

It's been a busy period for online hypnotherapy sessions and I've been busy helping people with issues such as anxiety, panic attacks, self-esteem, phobias, weight loss, confidence and much more. Hypnotherapy sessions by Zoom have continued to work effectively and my clients have enjoyed some outstanding results (for more on online hypnotherapy sessions read this previous article: The Effectiveness of Online Hypnotherapy: Skype and Zoom Hypnotherapy Sessions). Zoom hypnotherapy sessions continue to be an option if you live too far to travel to my office or if you just prefer it now that we've all got used to do much more online.

In accordance with the Government's lockdown easing roadmap, face to face sessions can resume in Ely and Newmarket from 12th April 2021. I'll be contacting anyone who carried over sessions from before the lockdown to arrange a new time to resume appointments. And if you are seeking successful face to face hypnotherapy sessions in Ely or Newmarket then get in touch and ask to arrange your free initial consultation so we can have a chat about working together to help you overcome your issues and feel better. 

hypnotherapy in ely and newmarket 

Mental Health During The Pandemic

I've covered a lot about mental health and the pandemic over the last year or so.  Whilst there have been some positives from the pandemic, and those who have experienced a boost to their well-being, the overall impact has been one of a detrimental effect on mental health.

Even before the pandemic, anxiety and depression were the most prevalent mental health disorders in the world. Anxiety levels have been rising for over a decade, and prescriptions for anti-depressants continue to rise (see Generalised Anxiety Disorder Levels Continue To Escalate). For healthcare staff, the mental health impacts are perhaps unprecedented (Covid-19 Anxiety, Stress and Trauma in Healthcare Workers).

All of the available evidence suggests that the pandemic is impacting upon mental health with a high prevalence of depression, anxiety and insomnia (Cénat, 2020).

Recent research has investigated global levels of depression and anxiety during the Covid-19 pandemic and how the implementation of mitigation strategies have impacted such disorders. Based upon a sample of over 226,000 people, Castaldelli-Maia, Marziali, Lu and Martins (2021) found high global prevalences of both depression and anxiety during the Covid-19 pandemic.

"The COVID-19 pandemic, and the resulting physical distancing measures to mitigate viral spread, has impacted population mental health worldwide. Despite finding a wide variation in anxiety and depression levels across countries and regions of the world, the high prevalence of mental health disorders is a considerable concern during the COVID era. Thus, mental health outcomes should not be addressed as a delayed consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic, but rather as an ongoing and concurrent epidemic."

And there is also evidence for the detrimental impact upon the mental health of young adults (read more here: Teenager Anxiety and Mental Health During the Pandemic). Research from young adults at university suggest increased levels of depression symptoms compared to before the pandemic, and a reduction in well-being.

Overall, it's pretty clear that many of you will have suffered an increase in anxiety and depression symptoms and an adverse impact upon your mental health  as a result of the pandemic.

 

Mental Health Help For Anxiety & Depression 

On the more positive side, if you are struggling with anxiety or depression symptoms right now, whether as a result of the pandemic or for some other reason, then there is effective help available. Hypnotherapy has an ever growing evidence base supporting its effectiveness for anxiety, depression and many other issues. With therapeutic help you tackle unwanted thoughts and feelings and start feeling better again (like the people who have left their feedback here: What People Say). 

With face to face hypnotherapy sessions resuming in Ely & Newmarket, and with the effectiveness of online Zoom hypnotherapy, it is possible to change how you feel and, whether it is a recent thing or more long-standing, you can take back control over your life and feel good again. 

To your health and happiness,

Dan Regan

Online Skype and Zoom Hypnotherapy  

Face-to-face hypnotherapy in Ely & Newmarket

 

Struggling with anxiety, stress, worry and fear and need some help? Find out how I can help with a Complimentary Hypnotherapy Strategy Session. Learn more here: Appointments

Find out what dozens of other people have said after their hypnotherapy sessions with Dan: Hypnotherapy Testimonials

And check out these powerful hypnosis downloads that can start helping you right away with anxiety, confidence and more: Hypnosis Downloads

 

References:

Castaldelli-Maia JM, Marziali ME, Lu Z, Martins SS (2021). Investigating the effect of national government physical distancing measures on depression and anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic through meta-analysis and meta-regression. Psychological Medicine 1–13. https://doi.org/ 10.1017/S0033291721000933

Cénat, J.M., Blais-Rochette, C., Kokou-Kpolou, C.K., Noorishad, P.G., Mukunzi, J.N., McIntee, S.E., Dalexis, R.D., Goulet, M.A. and Labelle, P., 2020. Prevalence of symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and psychological distress among populations affected by the COVID-19 pandemic: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Psychiatry research, p.113599.

Evans, S., Alkan, E., Bhangoo, J., Tenenbaum, H. and Ng-Knight, T., 2021. Effects of the COVID-19 lockdown on mental health, wellbeing, sleep, and alcohol use in a UK student sample. Psychiatry Research, p.113819.